Academic Requirements

Degrees, Academic Programs and Liberal Arts Studies


Degrees:

Master of Arts in Education
Master of Music
Master of Science
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Science
Bachelor of Science in Nursing
Bachelor of Music

 

Certificates:
Piano Pedagogy
Kodály Graduate
Theological and New Evangelization Studies

 

Undergraduate Programs:

Silver Lake College of the Holy Family offers majors and minors in a variety of academic disciplines. Major and minor areas of study build upon our dynamic Liberal Arts Studies Curriculum. Students at Silver Lake College join a community of learners which integrate values, academic disciplines, and experiences.


Graduate Programs:

Silver Lake College of the Holy Family offers graduate level work in the fields of business, education, and music. Graduate students at Silver Lake College:

  • Identify and acquire skills needed to provide ethical servant leadership,
  • Understand how to create organizations which are responsive to individual needs and to cultural diversity, and
  • Integrate knowledge and appropriate technology in the service of others.

Liberal Arts Core Curriculum

 

Mission Statement

Rooted in the Franciscan Intellectual Tradition and a Franciscan world view, Silver Lake College’s Liberal Arts Studies curriculum is committed to developing undergraduate students into servant leaders by giving them the opportunity to 1) discover and respect God’s goodness in themselves, the person with whom they relate and all creation; 2) critically seek the truth with humility; 3) integrate learning into wise personal and professional choice. This mission is carried out in an attitude of deep respect for each member of the College community, and positions each member of the College community to be a transformative presence within their own personal circle of influence.

 

Description

At Silver Lake College, the liberal arts are understood to liberate the human person by providing the opportunity for each student to discover the truth about what it means to be an excellent human person. “You shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free.” (John 8:32) The Franciscan experience of the liberal arts at the College is rooted in the intellectual conviction that truth serves goodness and that this goodness is most powerfully manifested in our relationships. One of the truths upon which a Franciscan liberal arts experience is built is the truth that the human person, made in the image and likeness of God, is essentially a relational, communal being. We are defined not as individuals, but by who we are in our fundamental relationships. At the College, our approach to the liberal arts is distinguished by our endeavor to provide students opportunities for personal, relational transformation.

Bonaventure understands the human person to exist within the three key relationships:

  • External relationships with the physical world
  • Internal relationships with oneself and others
  • Transcendent relationship with God

The core curriculum at Silver Lake College is rooted in these relationships and seeks to provide our students with the opportunity to explore and grow in each of these relationships. The hard sciences and math explore the material truths that govern the universe and delve into the student’s relationship/ stewardship of the physical world; the social sciences, history and literature inquire into the internal truths of what it means to be a human person and examines the student’s relationship with themselves and with other persons; the fine arts, philosophy and theology scrutinize transcendent truth regarding beauty and so probe the student’s relationship with God. At Silver Lake College, we pledge ourselves to helping our students grow in their intellectual search for the truth and in their moral commitment to become agents of goodness in their personal and professional relationships. In this way, the College delivers on our promise to provide a quality liberal arts education and professional preparation.

Silver Lake College students join a community of learners who embrace critical inquiry, respect for each person, and revere goodness. Graduates receive a foundation for continuing a lifelong path of learning; they are free, self-reliant persons who act justly in the world and lead through service to others. The goals of our core curriculum ensure that students have the knowledge, tools and support to build this foundation.

 

General Education Learning Outcomes

  1. Students analyze and interpret texts and data, articulating the differences and connections they discover, while recognizing the historical and social forces that shape the production of knowledge.
  2. Students conduct ethical, effective research by asking questions and solving problems, collaborating across their social networks, and communicating their findings with clarity and precision in order to create positive social change.
  3. Students recognize human and cultural diversity and the interconnectedness of societies worldwide.
  4. Students synthesize elements of the Franciscan Tradition and Worldview into their own lives and disciplinary contexts.

For First Time/ Full Time Freshman________ 14 courses

  • Learning Communities I and II (2 courses)
  • Writing (Composition II)
  • Literature (1 course)
  • Philosophy and Theology (1 course PHL, 1 course THL, and 1 course PHL or THL)
  • Fine Arts (1 course)
  • History (1 course)
  • Natural Science (1 course)
  • Math (MTH 110 or higher)
  • Social Science (1 course)
  • Cultural Diversity Elective (1 course)
  • Multidisciplinary Elective (1 course)

For Mid-year Freshmen and Transfers with Less than 45 Credits               12 courses

  • Writing (Composition II)
  • Literature (1 course)
  • Philosophy and Theology (1 course PHL, 1 course THL, and 1 course PHL or THL)
  • Fine Arts (1 course)
  • History (1 course)
  • Natural Science (1 course)
  • Math (MTH 110 or higher)
  • Social Science (1 course)
  • Cultural Diversity Elective (1 course)
  • Multidisciplinary Elective (1 course)

For 2+2 Transfers/ those seeking a second degree/ those with more than 45 credits       9 courses

  • Writing (Composition II)
  • Natural Science (1 course)
  • Social Science (1 course)
  • College Level Math (1 course)
  • Theology and Philosophy (2 courses, one of each)
  • Fine Arts or Literature (1 course)
  • Cultural Diversity/Multi-disciplinary Elective (2 courses)

Learning Communities I and II

Freshman First Year Experience

The Learning Communities is a credit-based orientation program for traditional first-year students; it features three linked courses, LAS 100, LAS 200, and a general education course aligned with LAS 100 during fall semesters. Traditional first-year students enter one of the discipline-specific communities, which lasts the entire first year, under the direction of a faculty member who acts as their academic advisor during the students’ first year at the College. The foundation of Learning Communities is LAS 100, which orients first-year students to college life, liberal arts education, academic success, and professional preparation. Academic advising permeates the course and includes specific activities on academic and professional goal-setting. These activities poise students to reflect on majors and minors, while setting the stage for academic planning. A majority of students complete the Learning Communities experience by selecting an academic major, with an advisor in their academic program.